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March 22, 2022

Earth Hour's First Ever Film Festival This Saturday

Kathryn Shanks
Earth Hour's First Ever Film Festival This Saturday
This year’s Earth Hour will be accompanied by the virtual screening of five uplifting documentaries about the climate and sustainability.

Earth Hour is an Australian initiative to raise awareness and advocate for stronger climate action. Millions of people across the country will switch off their lights for an hour this Saturday, March 26, between 8:30–9:30pm, forming a cohesive movement for the environment.

Aussies who register on Earth Hour’s website will get an invite to the inaugural Earth Hour Film Festival, which will be hosted by WWF-Australia and Documentary Australia. This virtual film festival will see the screening of five documentaries alongside a new short film by award-winning filmmaker Damon Gameau.

Regenerating Australia (Damon Gameau, Anna Kaplan) is a seventeen-minute short film that showcases a speculative future for Australia: On New Year’s Eve, 2029, a news anchor looks back on the decade ‘that could be’, in which Australia got serious about climate action. The film imagines what the future would look like if the country transitioned to a cleaner, more community-focused economy, with clean energy, regenerated landscapes, and high-speed rail networks all featuring.

Cry of the Forests (Jane Hammond) focuses on Western Australia’s south-west forests, which sit in one of the most biodiverse regions in the world. Cry of the Forests takes viewers to the heart of the forests to see first-hand the beauty of these towering ecosystems and the life they support. We meet the activists armed with go-pros and dressed in camouflage gear risking their lives to bear witness to the logging and we meet traditional custodians, tourist operators & farmers on the frontline of the battle to protect our forests. This film seeks to change perceptions about native forests and their true value.

Blue (Karina Holden, Sarah Beard) is a provocative mix of scientific essay, investigative journalism and arresting imagery about the Great Barrier Reef featuring passionate advocates for ocean preservation. Tackling themes of habitat destruction, species loss and pollution, Blue takes us into the ocean realm where we witness ocean change first-hand. And as we learn of the ecological crimes occurring worldwide, we also uncover the shocking truths happening on our own Australian shorelines.

The Seeds of Vandana Shiva (Camilla Becket, Paige Livingstone) tells the story of Dr. Vandana Shiva, looking at how she rose to prominence in the food justice movement to inspire an international crusade for change.

The film also illuminates two visions for feeding an exploding world population: The first, an industrial model controlled by corporations. And the alternative—organic, regenerative, and local food systems that restore biodiversity, mitigate climate change, build strong communities, and feed the world.

Wild Things (Sally Ingelton) is a feature-length documentary that follows a new generation of environmental activists that are mobilising against forces more powerful than themselves and saying, enough. Armed only with mobile phones, this growing army of eco-warriors will do whatever it takes to save their futures from the ravages of climate change. 

When the River Runs Dry (Rory McLeod, Peter Yates) dives into the true story behind one of Australia’s worst environmental disasters: the Darling River. The film calls upon experts, Indigenous elders and locals, to unravel the cause and effects of this catastrophe on people and wildlife. It seeks to bring an ecological and social catastrophe to the attention of Australians and people around the world. The Darling River’s waters have been overallocated to irrigation for decades, and efforts to return environmental flows to sustainable levels have been met with organised resistance.

These diverse films are all exceptional ways to learn more about our world and the problems we face surrounding the climate crisis, deforestation, food shortages, and water scarcity. If you’d like access to these documentaries, make sure to sign up to participate in Earth Hour at their website for this Saturday!

If you liked this article, you might like our feature about the denim industry’s poor track record in ethical and sustainable business.

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